Androecium Earrings in Green Apple Gold Plated Brass

In stock

510 €

The British designer Sian Evans is inspired this season by kinetic sculpture and a botanic codex, bringing us a collection with a serious plant and flower-based theme. One of the best pieces is this pair of earrings, the Androecium, a mobile made from multiple pieces of brass plated in green gold. Nature knows best.

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SIZE CONVERSION

SHOES
UK
2 2.5 3 3.5 4 4.5 5 5.5 6 6.5 7 7.5 8
US
5 5.5 6 6.5 7 7.5 8 8.5 9 9.5 10 10.5 11
EU/IT
35 35.5 36 36.5 37 37.5 38 38.5 39 39.5 40 40.5 41
FR
36 36.5 37 37.5 38 38.5 39 39.5 40 40.5 41 41.5 42
JAP
21.5 22 22.5 23 23.5 24 24.5 25 25.5 26 26.5 27 27.5
AUS
3.5 4 4.5 5 5.5 6 6.5 7 7.5 8 8.5 9 9.5
CHINA
35 35.5 36 37 37.5 38 39 39.5 40 41 41.5 42 43
CHINA (MM)
225 228 230 233 235 238 240 243 245 248 250 253 255

Sian Evans

For her Fall/Winter 2018 collection, designer Sian Evans was inspired by a codex. Committed to the environment, the designer has chosen to create jewelry evoking flowers and other plants at various stages of their existence, with style of course. The result? Elegant and hypnotic necklaces that produce shadows on our necks and add an original touch to all our outfits. Inflorescence, Androecium or Infructescence, which one will be your favorite?


Sian Evans founded her eponymous jewelry brand in 1986. The British designer, based in London, imagined both inventive and unique pieces. Right after graduating, she founded her eponymous brand, which quickly became renowned. After a few years focused on the label’s development, then a nearly ten year slow-down, the brand came back strong in 2014. More eco-friendly, Sian Evans jewelry advocates "Slow jewelry", and the designer often reworks successful pieces. Each Sian Evans jewel is handmade. Its asperities and small defects make its uniqueness.

 

Sian Evans, who is British, developed her creativity as a teenager. She first wanted to become a painter, but studying at Bournemouth College of Art, she chose to work with jewelry. She then entered the Cass, School of Art, Architecture and Design. When she graduated, she wanted to sell her creations around the world so she founded her eponymous brand. She achieved her goal in just a few seasons.

In 2001, after declining several proposals to teach, the jewelry designer accepted a job at Central Saint Martins. Exhausted by the management of her company, she gradually reduced her business to the point where she was alone in the studio again, as she was in her beginnings. In 2014, she felt ready to revive her brand from a different angle. She presented its new identity: simpler, more ecological and more focused on craftsmanship.